Morning Reading Nov. 25.

I confess, dear reader, that the title does leave much to be desired, doesn’t it. Don’t worry, I’m working on that. These morning posts may only have have the date in the title for now, but I’m working on something creative and puny to give y’all a glimpse of what’s inside from day to day. Thanks for hanging with me as I work out these kinks.

As always, here’s an excerpt or two from my morning reading today. Continuing back with Jack Gilbert’s poems that I read yesterday, here is another bit from the first one. Tomorrow, I’ll share my third and final excerpt from that one before, reluctantly, moving on. Have a good day. 🙂

“It puzzles me that / I care so much for the ghost of the boy in high school, / since I am not interested in those times. But I know / why the other one frightens me. He is the question / about whether the loves were phantoms of what existed / as appearance only.” — from “Becoming Regardless” by Jack Gilbert

Here’s from the prose. Fun stuff to think about…

“A lot of foot and knee injuries that are currently plaguing us are actually caused by people running with shoes that actually make our feet weak, cause us to over-pronate, give us knee problems. Until 1972, when the modern athletic shoe was invented by Nike, people ran on very thin-soled shoes, had strong feet, and had much lower incidence of knee injuries.” — Daniel Lieberman, professor of evolutionary biology at the University of Harvard, via “Born To Run” by Christopher McDougall

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Morning Reading Nov. 23.

Hi everyone!

Here are some interesting quotes from my morning reading. I’d love to hear your thoughts on them. 🙂

Waiting meaning without things. Meaning love sometimes dying out, sometimes being taken away. Meaning that often he lives silent in the middle of the world’s music. Waiting for the best to come again. Beginning to hear the silence as he waits. Beginning to like the silence maybe too much.” — From “Waiting And Finding” by Jack Gilbert.

Here’s my favorite of the day:

“But that smile is strangely stirring. You can tell she’s having an absolute blast, as if there’s nothing on earth she’d rather be doing than here, on this lost trail in the middle of the Appalachian wilderness. Even though she’s just run four miles farther than a marathon, she looks light-footed and carefree, her eyes twinkling, her ponytail swinging around her head like a shirt in the fist of a triumphant Brazilian soccer player. Her naked delight is unmistakable; if forces a smile to her lips that’s so honest and unguarded, you feel she’s lost in the grip of artistic inspiration.” — From “Born to Run” by Christopher McDougall

Neat Things I read on Nov. 16.

Dear Readers 🙂

I have to stop by the library today and pick up another collection of Jack Gilbert poems, so today’s final quote is a recycled one many of you liked, but it goes well with the other one, which I did discover just this morning. Here’s a quote or two from my daily reading:

“Vigil could smell the apocalypse coming, and he’d tried to warn his runners. ‘There are two goddesses in your heart,’ he told them. ‘The Goddess of Wisdom and the Goddess of Wealth. Everyone thinks they need to get wealth first, and wisdom will come. So they concern themselves with chasing money. But they have it backwards. You have to give your heart to the Goddess of Wisdom, give her all your love and attention, and the Goddess of Wealth will become jealous, and follow you.’ Ask nothing from your running, in other words, and you’ll get more than you ever imagined.” —from “Born To Run” by Christopher McDougall.

Come to think of it, I bet the same principle applies to dance. Anyway, here’s y’all’s second quote from my morning reading, which goes well with all that:

“Think, they say patiently, we could make you famous again. Let me fall in love one last time, I beg them. Teach me mortality, frighten me into the present. Help me to find the heft of these days. That the nights will be full enough and my heart feral.”
—from “I Imagine The Gods” by Jack Gilbert